@article{doi:10.1093/geroni/igx004.828,Author = {Bragina, I and Lippke, S and Pischke, C and Meyer, J and Muellmann, S and Rost, E and Zeeb, H and Voelcker-Rehage, C},Title = {PROMOTE: Tailoring Physical Activity Interventions to Promote Healthy Ageing},Journal = {Innovation in Aging},Year = {2017},Pages = {221},Doi = {10.1093/geroni/igx004.828},type = {article},Abstract = {Physical activity (PA) and the reduction of sedentary behavior positively influence healthy aging. PA results in increases in aerobic capacity and strength and is associated with less age-related cognitive decline. Further, a pronounced sedentary behavior, i.e. prolonged periods of sitting or overall inactivity, increases mortality risk regardless of PA level [1]. The interaction between sedentary behavior, dedicated exercise and PA level, and their effects on physical and mental fitness has not yet been fully elucidated. 120 healthy older adults (OA) participated in a 10-week exercise intervention within the PROMOTE project on tailoring PA interventions to promote healthy ageing. The intervention was tailored to individuals' age, gender, and previous PA behavior. Participants were randomized into two intervention groups (IG) and a waiting-list control group. Both IGs received a web-based self-regulatory counseling aid, which aims to support the participants in reaching a sufficient PA level. IG differed in the way of PA monitoring: subjective self-report vs. subjective self-report and objective measure of PA using an off-the-shelf activity tracker. (Non-)activity behavior (assessed objectively via ActiGraph) as well as physical and mental fitness were assessed at baseline and post intervention. Multiple regression and moderation analyses will be performed to analyze the interaction of dedicated exercise, supportive-technology, PA level and sedentarism and their effect on physical and mental health. We expect sedentary behavior to moderate the association between PA and physical/mental fitness. Results will contribute to optimized health promotion programs and recommendations for OA. [1] Hagger-Johnson, et al. (2016). American J Prev Med 50(2), 154–160.}}@COMMENT{Bibtex file generated on }